Nostradamus, The Man Who Saw Through Time. Interestingly, the author, Lee McCann completed and published the book in 1941, so his speculations about Events of World War II, Hitler’s activities, and many future events are interesting when considering that the author did not know the outcome of the events." />
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To See Things Through

A number of years ago I picked up a book entitled, Nostradamus, The Man Who Saw Through Time. Interestingly, the author, Lee McCann completed and published the book in 1941, so his speculations about Events of World War II, Hitler’s activities, and many future events are interesting when considering that the author did not know the outcome of the events. I purchased the book not knowing what to think about Nostradamus. Was he some itinerant soothsayer, an eight-ball prophet, someone with questionable religious beliefs? After looking into the book, I found myself talking out loud with regard to the author’s view or interpretation of Nostradamus’ writings. At various points I found myself saying, “No! Can’t you see! That’s Charles DeGaulle! He’s the one from Lille, France! …or, “those are the horrible lime pits. You poor man, you were unaware of the horrible things Hitler did.” In any case, I found myself participating in a historical match-up.

I hadn’t looked at the book for quite some time, but then, just the other day I pulled it off the shelf to have a casual look. On one of the very last pages there was reference to a particular writing of Nostradamus wherein he makes reference to the very last popes to be, supposedly, in the History of Christendom. Interestingly, the author Lee McCann makes reference to a prophet named Malachy (not the Biblical Malachi) who wrote also of the last popes, and both Nostradamus and Malachy seem to place this phenomenon, from what I can see, in the times that you and I are currently walking the earth. Now this may or may not be true, but one statement in particular caught my eye. It was this writing from a quatrain of Nostradamus,
“The last one but to be called pope,
Will take Diana for his day and repose,
He will wander far on account of his distracted head,
Seeking to deliver a great people from economic ruin.”

It was the ‘economic ruin’ part that caught my eye. I look at what’s being played out in Congress now with regard to the debt ceiling and the stand-off, almost wishing that I had the same sort of bird’s-eye view of history that I have reading this old Nostradamus book.
I hear pundits stating, “Since Franklin Roosevelt a President has never been re-elected who raised taxes, or, since Franklin Roosevelt, a president has never been re-elected with these staggering unemployment numbers.” But my answer to that is, “This should really be no-sweat for this President, since he has been reading and living from The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Playbook from day one of his presidency. In fact, it occurred to me that an avid and confirmed acolyte of the Saul Alinsky approach to overturning your capitalist society would actually welcome anything that pushes the stock markets, bond markets and economy in general into a state resembling the last Great Depression. The ensuing dependency on the still largest and most powerful organization in the World, The U.S. Government, would be almost immediate, and welcome by any advocate of Re-structuring. We’ve seen it done before.
There is no question that recently many nations throughout the world have been facing economic ruin. I now see what I could not see before. I see why that might concern a Pope; the evnt could plummet people all over the world into a strange and distasteful state, economically confusing and socially coerced by heartless intellectuals masquerading as ‘the concerned’. Just as the strange and distasteful state of Socialism in Russia left people in an oppressive social environment, a hopeless economic state and a generally depressing malaise for 70 years, so could government dependencies in nations around the world.
How convenient for a president who is a great advocate of redistribution, and a powerful and controlling central government to have someone to blame for the downgrading of our credit, the tumbling markets, the collapsing bond ratings, and… my, my… the need for higher taxes ala FDR, and the Big Federal Government to step in everywhere and see things through.

Copyright July 17th, 2011 by John P. Schumake

*Note: I do not necessarily wholly concur with nor endorse the web-links that I point to. They provide an interesting look, perspective, or reference. The context of my writing must be in all cases considered.


2 Comments

  • Mariana

    Glenn Beck, in his book Broke , cites Milton Friedman as his economic idol .In a Time Magazine ieeirvntw in 1965, Milton Friedman said we are all Keynesians now .In an address to the American Economic Association in 1968, Milton Friedman argued that the trade-off between unemployment and inflation was a product of illusion. If high rates of inflation are maintained long enough, companies and workers will come to expect it and build this into their econonmic expectations.Robert Solow said Everything reminds Milton of the money supply. Well, everything reminds me of sex, but I keep it out of my papers. As we know, money supply targeting did not prevent the recent Global Financial Crisis. Followers of Milton Friedman included Paul Volker, Alan Greenspan and Ben Bernanke, who thought they could use the Central Bank to control the economy.Glenn Beck believes in market liberalism, where those non-public financial institutions should be allowed to be unregulated, and we know this lack of regulation created the Global Financial Crisis. We should trust these guardians of money to do what is right for us and create financial bubbles to burst. Is this a natural or good way to run our economy?

 




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